Custom Martial Arts Chinese & Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with Martial Arts characters on a wall scroll or portrait.

See our special page full of Martial Arts related words and phrases.
We also have specific pages for Karate, Aikido, Kung Fu, and Jujitsu.
If you need a different style of martial arts, just enter it in the calligraphy search box in the upper left of this page.


  1. Martial Arts / Wu Shu

  2. Martial Arts / Budo

  3. Martial Arts

  4. Martial Arts Master

  5. Martial Arts Skills

  6. Dojo / Martial Arts Studio

  7. Martial Morality / Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue

  8. Mixed Martial Arts / MMA

  9. Mixed Martial Arts

10. The Nature of Martial Arts

11. Shaolin Martial Arts

12. Aikido

13. Bruce Lee

14. Karate-Do

15. Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand

16. Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

17. Shotokan Aikido

18. Danketsu Karate-Do


Martial Arts / Wu Shu

wǔ shù
bujutsu
Martial Arts / Wu Shu Scroll

武術 is the very Chinese way to express "Martial Arts". Some even use this word to directly describe Kung Fu. But this is a label that fits all disciplines from Karate to Kung Fu to Taekwondo.

Note: This also means Martial Arts with the same appearance in old Korean Hanja characters and is pronounced "musul" or "musur" in Korean.

While this is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean, this also means "martial arts" in Japanese.

Martial Arts / Budo

Way of the Warrior
wǔ dào
bu dou
Martial Arts / Budo Scroll

武道 is the very common Japanese way to say "Martial Arts".

武道 is used mostly in Japanese dojos but is also understood in Chinese and Korean.

Some will use this title to mean chivalry (the conduct of a knight) or military art. The way this word is understood would depend on the context in which it is used.

The first character means "force" or "warlike" or "essence of a warrior".

The second character means "method", "path", and "the way". It is the same character used to describe/mean the philosophy of Taoism / Daoism.

Some will also translate this as, "The Way of the Warrior", especially in the context of Korean martial arts.

Martial Arts

wǔ yì
Martial Arts Scroll

武藝 is a Korean Hanja title that means, "martial arts" or "military skill".

武藝 is also a word in Chinese but used more often in the context of Korean martial arts.

From Korean, this is romanized as either "mu ye" or "moo ye". If you want to order this in modern Korean Hangul, just click the Hangul in the pronunciation box next to the Korean flag above.

Martial Arts Master

wǔ yún zhě
bugeisha
Martial Arts Master Scroll

武芸者 is the Japanese Kanji title for "Martial Arts Master". It suggests that you have reached at least the level of black belt, and are probably to the level where you are ready to become an instructor.

Please consider carefully where you stand before ordering this phrase on a wall scroll. If you are not a master, this will make you look a bit foolish.

If you want to get this as a gift for your master at the dojo. Try to discreetly make sure this term is used in your school. Different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts use different terms. You may notice in the Romaji and the characters, this has the same characters as "geisha" which means "person skilled in arts" (what a geisha girl really is). The title here has the character for "martial", "warrior", and/or "military" in front of it. Therefore the literal translation is "martial art person".

These Kanji are valid Chinese characters and Korean Hanja but this title does not really make sense in Chinese and not often used in Korean, though a Chinese or Korean would be able to guess the meaning by looking at the first and last characters.

Martial Arts Skills

wǔ jì
bugi
Martial Arts Skills Scroll

This can be translated as "martial arts skills", "warrior skills", or "military skills" depending on usage.

In both Japanese and Chinese, rather than meaning martial arts, this speaks more to the skills that you posses in regards to martial arts. This phrase also has a light suggestion of "having an itch to show off these skills".

Dojo / Martial Arts Studio

dào cháng
dou jou
Dojo / Martial Arts Studio Scroll

道場 is the Japanese term for a room or hall in which martial arts are taught.

道場 is often spelled "dojo" which has become a word in the English lexicon. However, the true Romaji is "doujou" or "dōjō".

Please note: The Chinese definition of these characters is quite different. In Chinese, this is a place where Buddhist or Taoist mass is held. It could also be a place where spiritual or psychic events are performed.

Martial Morality / Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue

wǔ dé
butoku
Martial Morality / Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue Scroll

This refers to the virtue, morality, and ethics that any practitioner of martial arts should posses.

This can be used in both Chinese and Japanese in lieu of English terms such as "soldierly virtue", "good conduct" (military), "warrior ethics", and being honorable in regards to any fight or competition.


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Morality of Deed

Mixed Martial Arts / MMA

sàn dǎ
Mixed Martial Arts / MMA Scroll

散打 is Sanda, a Chinese word for "Mixed Martial Arts" or "MMA".

Mixed Martial Arts

zōng hé gé dòu
Mixed Martial Arts Scroll

綜合格鬥 is a common Chinese title for "Mixed Martial Arts" or "MMA".

The characters or words in this title break down this way:
綜合 zōng hé = composite / synthesized / to sum up / to integrate / to synthesize.
格 gé = style / frame / rule.
斗 dòu = fight / to battle / to struggle.

Mixed Martial Arts

sougoukakutougi
Mixed Martial Arts Scroll

総合格闘技 is a Japanese title for mixed martial arts or MMA.

Note: Some will use other titles for this rather new word or evolving concept. This seems to be the most common right now in the Japanese language.

The Nature of Martial Arts

zì rán wǔ dào
shi zen bu do
The Nature of Martial Arts Scroll

The first two characters create a word that means nature, natural, or spontaneous.

The last two characters are often translated as martial arts.

Shaolin Martial Arts

shǎo lín wǔ gōng
Shaolin Martial Arts Scroll

少林武功 is the title for "Shaolin Wu Gong" or "Shaolin martial arts".

Aikido

hé qì dào
ai ki dou
Aikido Scroll

合気道 is the modern Japanese way to write Aikido.

Aikido is often referred to as the defensive martial art.

While Aikido was born in Japan, it has become a somewhat famous form of defensive tactics taught to soldiers and Marines, as well as some law enforcement officers in the West.

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony".
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit".
The third means "way" or "method".


Please note that while the original 合氣道 characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Note: It is somewhat accepted that this is the origin of Hapkido in Korea. And other than a modern simplification to the middle Kanji of this 3-Kanji word, it is written the same in Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Hapkido

Bruce Lee

lǐ xiǎo lóng
bu ruu su ri
Bruce Lee Scroll

李小龍 is the real full name of Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee Many people have no idea that Bruce Lee had a "real" Chinese name. In Mandarin and Cantonese, he is known as "Lǐ XiǎoLóng" and "Léi SíuLùng" respectively.

He kept his family name pronunciation (Li = Lee). 李 is a common family name that also means "plum".

His given name 小龍 (Xiao-Long) literally means "little dragon". 李小龍 is why you often see the character for dragon associated with Bruce Lee on various posters etc.

For a pronunciation lesson, the "X" in Romanized Mandarin is pronounced like a "sh" sound but with your tongue at the bottom of your mouth. The vowel sound in "Long" is like the English "oh", not like the "ah" sound in the English word "long".

If you are a big Bruce Lee fan, you should know this information, and you should have this wall scroll hanging in your room or martial arts studio.

Note: Japanese use these same exact Chinese characters / Kanji to write Bruce Lee's real name (with different pronunciation - which is a bit like how the name "Bruce Lee" sounds in English).


See Also:  Kung Fu | Marital Arts

Karate-Do

kōng shǒu dào
kara te dou
Karate-Do Scroll

The literal meaning of these characters is "empty hand method" or "empty hand way".

Credit is given that karate started in China but migrated and became refined, and vastly popular in Japan.

Karate is a martial art that uses no blades of weapons other than the "natural weapons" that God gave to humans (fists and feet). The last character somehow became optional but the meaning of that character is "method" or "the way" as in Taoism / Daoism.

Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand

kōng shǒu quán fǎ
kara te ken pou
Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand Scroll

The first two characters mean "karate" - technically they express "empty hand".

The last two express "fist law" which is Romanized from Japanese as "Kenpo" or "Kempo".

That "empty hand" translation can be understood better when you grasp the idea that karate is a martial art without weapons (other than the weapons organic to your body, such as your foot, hand, fist, etc). When you practice karate, you do so with empty hands (no weapons).

Note: There is also an antiquated way to write karate. It has the same pronunciation but a different first character which means "Tang" as in the Tang Dynasty. Some dojos use that form - let us know if you need that alternate form, and we'll add it for you.

Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

shào lín sì quán fǎ
shourinji kenpou
Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo Scroll

少林寺拳法 is a specific type of martial arts in Japan that claims origins in the Kung Fu practiced in the original Shaolin Monastery of China.

The first three characters mean "Shaolin Monastery" and you might notice the Japanese is pronounced in a very similar way. 少林寺拳法 is because many words were "borrowed" from the original Chinese when Japan did not have a written language and simply absorbed Chinese characters into their language around the 5th century. When a Japanese word did not exist, the Chinese pronunciation was often absorbed as well as the written form.

The last two characters mean "fist law" or "method of the fist". It has long been argued as to whether the Japanese for these characters should be Romanized as "kempo" or "kenpo". The official method should be "kenpou" but it's common to drop the "u" that comes after the "o".

I imagine if you are looking for this title, you already know what it means, so the above is simply extra information that a student of Shorinji Kempo might want to know.

Shotokan Aikido

sōng tāo guǎn hé qì dào
shou tou kan ai ki dou
Shotokan Aikido Scroll

This is the title for Shotokan Aikido in Japanese.

Note: Chinese and Korean pronunciations of these characters are included above, however, this title would only be understood in Chinese or Korean by someone who practices or is familiar with Shotokan Aikido. Please consider this title to be "Japanese only".


See Also:  Hapkido

Danketsu Karate-Do

dan ketsu kara te dou
Danketsu Karate-Do Scroll

団結空手道 is the title for Danketsu Karate-Do, a dojo located in Stroudsburg, PA.

団結 (danketsu) means union, unity, or combination.

空手道 (karate-do) means "empty hand way".


If you need you martial arts school/dojo/academy added to my database, just give me the info (actual Chinese/Japanese text if you have it).




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Danketsu Karate-Do Scroll
Danketsu Karate-Do Scroll
Danketsu Karate-Do Scroll
Danketsu Karate-Do Scroll


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Danketsu Karate-Do Vertical Portrait
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